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"There really was a terrible and bloody feud, perhaps the most deadly and least known in all the annals of the West. I saw the ground, the cabins, the graves, all so darkly suggestive of what must have happened.... Many descendants of those killed are living there now. But no one likes to talk about it.... Suffice it to say that this romance is true to my conception of the war, and I base it upon the setting I learned to know and love so well, upon the strange passions of primitive people, and upon my instinctive reaction to the facts and rumors that I gathered."

To the Last Man is a Western, a romance, and an historical novel. This Zane Grey story is based on the historical Arizona feud known as the Pleasant Valley War, in which two frontier families battle over cattle rustling in Arizona’s Tonto Basin. Grey made several extended trips to the area, posing as hunter and horseman to learn the facts of what happened there.

Zane Grey (1872-1939) was born in Zanesville, Ohio, founded by his mother’s father, who had been granted the land by his father, a soldier of the American Revolution. Zane became interested in writing early on. He was also an excellent baseball player in college, but in deciding whether to follow a career in writing or in professional baseball he ended up as a dentist in his father’s footsteps. But as his writing career became successful, he dropped dentistry and wrote full time, creating around 100 novels in his lifetime. The most famous, Riders of the Purple Sage, is said to be the most famous western of all time. His stories were remade into, by one count, 112 movies. His works were also adapted for radio and television, including the Zane Grey Theatre  that ran on television from 1956-58.

Book publisher: Grosset & Dunlap Publishers, New York
Book copyright: Harper & Brothers, 1922
Book edition: Reprinted from the original plates
Pages:
311 (324 bound pages)
Size:
5″ x 7-5/8″
Dust jacket:
 Yes
Illustrations: None
Digital edition © 2005 Curtis Philips. All Rights Reserved.

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